Author Louisa McKerrow

Louisa is the Communications Manager for WWF-New Zealand (World Wide Fund for Nature). She has extensive experience in the areas of media, communications and public relations. Her pen, camera and sense of humour have led her to wonderful work locations throughout Australia, Canada, USA, Solomon Islands, Vietnam, Cambodia, New Zealand and Peru. She was raised on a sheep and cattle farm in Outback Australia. Her specialty sectors are the environment (forest/marine/species conservation and climate change), crisis communications (biosecurity, floods and cyclones), and agriculture (livestock and broad-acre farming). She is an Open Water-accredited diver and has explored underwater ecosystems in the Solomon Islands and Cambodia.

A collaboration between the fishing industry, government, iwi, and environmental groups – today announced that a trial using on-board cameras to monitor accidental capture of seabirds by fishers in the Hauraki Gulf would be extended for a third year. The trialling, which began in 2016, is aimed first at testing how well cameras can monitor seabird by-catch compared to human observers; and second at gathering more robust data on how many seabirds are being caught. Takoketai/Black Petrel is a threatened seabird that nests nowhere else on Earth apart from Aotea/Great Barrier Island and Hauturu/Little Barrier Island. The collaborative group, called…

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At the recent International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting, governments highlighted the plight of Māui dolphins, expressed concern over their lack of protection, and called on New Zealand to do more. The just-released formal record of the meeting includes a decision by the IWC to express “particular concern” for Māui dolphins’ survival. This is the first time that countries have raised the plight of the critically-endangered Māui dolphins during a full inter-governmental session. Until now, Māui dolphins have been a concern for the IWC’s Scientific Committee, who have repeatedly urged the New Zealand government to protect them from human threats. Footage…

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WWF-New Zealand says that today’s new Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report on the science of keeping average global warming below 1.5°C shows both the real challenges we face and the opportunities we have to unlock a safe climate future. David Tong, WWF-New Zealand senior campaigner, said “This is a landmark global moment. The world’s top scientists have confirmed that it is still 100% possible to keep climate change below 1.5°C. Together, we can ensure a safe climate future remains possible. “The difference between 1.5°C and 2°C is huge. For our Pacific neighbours, it’s an existential difference. Climate change…

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WWF-New Zealand says that today’s announcement that a Māui dolphin was found dead near Raglan on Sunday highlights the urgent need for more protection throughout their habitat. WWF-New Zealand CEO Livia Esterhazy today said: “We are so sad to hear this news. While it’s too early to know what happened, with only around 60 adult Māui dolphins remaining, the death of just one is a tragedy.” “We express particular condolences to the local iwi and hapu, as kaitiaki for Māui dolphins. We know that Kiwis love these dolphins. This death pushes an already critically-endangered population closer to extinction. None of…

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WWF-New Zealand today welcomed the release of the over 15,000 submissions that New Zealanders made on the proposed new climate law, the Zero Carbon Bill. David Tong, WWF-New Zealand senior campaigner, said “We are incredibly excited by the overwhelming support that New Zealanders have shown for the Zero Carbon Act. Over 15,000 Kiwis spoke out, and they overwhelmingly supported the new law. “Over 91% of Kiwis who had their say on the Zero Carbon Act backed the most ambitious possible option for the 2050 target – net zero emissions. 96% of people supported the creation of a climate commission. “We’ve…

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Environmental group WWF-New Zealand today welcomed the announcement by Fisheries Minister Stuart Nash that electronic catch and position reporting will be implemented across the entire fishing fleet. Electronic reporting enables more accurate and timely information to be gathered on commercial fish catches. The largest trawl boats are already using this technology, which will be progressively rolled-out across the rest of the NZ fishing fleet during 2019. Commenting on the announcement, WWF-New Zealand Chief Executive officer Livia Esterhazy said, “WWF-New Zealand welcomes this announcement. It is extremely difficult to manage what is not properly measured so enabling more timely and accurate…

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One of New Zealand’s most ambitious and creative conservation projects, Reconnecting Northland, is entering an exciting new phase of its life. WWF-New Zealand has been one of the organisations that set it on its feet, but it’s now up and running! The programme aims for region-wide ecological restoration, focusing on healthy relationships between humans, water, and land. Based in The Orchard in Whangārei, it has partnerships throughout Northland. “We now find ourselves in a really exciting phase and are enthused by what the future holds for this organisation and its young, passionate and vibrant team,” said Eamon Nathan, Pou Manatū…

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