Shipwreck Hunters Presents: The Steamer Juno

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This is a simple shore dive about 200 feet from shore in 20 feet of water. There isn’t much left of this 140-foot-long wooden steamer and the zebra mussels seem not to be present on the wreck. What’s left is a simple and enjoyable shore dive. The Juno was built in 1885 and after nearly 30 years of transporting goods and materials, it was purchased to be used as a breakwater. Most of the machinery on this ship was removed in 1914, and it sat near its current location, helping to load larger, more modern ships with stone from a nearby quarry. After being hit by waves for several years and not being maintained, the steamer gradually sank beneath the surface to its current location.

After being cleared of the machinery in 1914, the Juno wreck still had some small items on it. There are still pulleys and hooks and a few other items that should remain on the wreck.

Save Our Shipwrecks (SOS) Motto

“SOS is dedicated to the preservation of shipwrecks and other archaeological remains. Members should practise low-impact diving techniques and refrain from collecting artifacts, except as part of a licensed archaeological study. Arrangements must be made for the conservation and curation of any remains recovered.”

“Artifacts on or recovered from marine heritage sites remain public property, even when collected under an archaeological license. Members shall refrain from the commercial trafficking of marine heritage artifacts, particularly the buying or selling of unlawful or undocumented artifacts.”

Save Our Shipwrecks, Ontario

To get to the site, it is easiest to take the 401 to the Waverly exit and head south towards the lake, Co-ordinates for the wreck are 43° 53′ 0.9996″ N 78° 0′ 2.0016″ W.

Thanks to YouTube (Shipwreck Hunters) from Explorer Diving, Kingston, Ontario

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About Author

Kathy is the owner of Kirk Scuba Gear, a passionate Scuba Diver, Ocean Advocate and Managing Editor of The Scuba News Canada

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