Gondola Point Ferries from Quispamsis to the Kingston Peninsula, New Brunswick

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In the Canadian province of New Brunswick, there is a cable ferry called the Gondola Point Ferry. The ferry travels across the Kennebecasis River, connecting Gondola Point in Quispamsis on the southern bank with Reeds Point on the Kingston Peninsula. Route 119 in New Brunswick is carried by the ferry. There are three different crossing points to the Kingston peninsula. Gondola Point, Milledgeville (though not on a cable), and Grand Bay Westfield are all nearby as well.

The crossing is 0.7 kilometres (0.43 miles) long, takes 5 minutes, and is toll-free. The crossing is served by two ferries, each carrying up to 24 cars at a time. The service is provided by a single ferry 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, with a second ferry brought into service during peak periods. The New Brunswick Department of Transportation operates it.

There are also cable ferries in Bellisle and Evandale. It has been said that the Bellisle ferry is the world’s longest ferry crossing.

Gondola Point
Operates on: Kennebecasis River between Gondola Point on Rte. 119 & 845 on the Kingston Peninsula
Length of Crossing: 0.7 km
Crossing Time: 5 min.

RGL Fairweather (F98)
Capacity: 24 Car
Schedule: 24 Hours – Year Round

William Pitt II (F99)
Capacity: 24 Car
Schedule: 16 Hours/Day – Year Round

For ferry information: https://www.facebook.com/groups/469883766445469/

About Mike Adams

Mike’s mission is to encourage more diving in the Maritime province of New Brunswick. He also makes historical videos in addition to diving videos. This year, he’ll be documenting aviation crashes in the province of New Brunswick. In this province alone, there are over 300 recorded accidents, and he has teamed up with the Canadian Aviation Historical Society to record the history and stories of the pilots who perished in some of these crashes. Mike has also partnered with the “Hammond River Angling Association” to create a series of videos for them about salmon and the protection of one of our local rivers, the Hammond River.

Mike’s adventures will be accompanied by The Scuba News Canada, which will cover his work in the coming months.

Subscribe to Mike’s YouTube Channel, RiverVids for more diving adventures.

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Kathy is the owner of Kirk Scuba Gear, a passionate Scuba Diver, Ocean Advocate and Managing Editor of The Scuba News Canada

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