40 Minute Lunch Snorkel = a Shopping Cart Full of Bottles

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Where does he even begin?

Saltwater Sean, most recently, discovered a stoneware ginger beer from Sussex, New Brunswick in the Sackville River as he was leaving work. He returned later and searched the Sackville River (low and calm) during his lunch break. Sean came to the conclusion that it had to be a dumping ground. Sean removed a shopping cart from the river and filled it full with bottles he pulled up from the river, including a couple of antique bottles circa 1900. He claims that the river has been cleaned up, and learned a valuable lesson :: always bring snorkeling equipment to work!

Plastic Waste
Image via Facebook

In Nova Scotia, Canada, the Sackville River flows through Hants County and the Halifax Regional Municipality. It enters the Bedford Basin. The Little Sackville River is a tributary. The Sackville River and its watershed encompass a large area of outstanding natural beauty within the Halifax Regional Municipality and the county of East Hants. Much of the watershed, river, and tributaries have been harmed by neglect and previous development practices.

So, how does trash end up in the ocean/rivers/streams/lakes? It has been dumped, pumped, spilled, leaked, and even washed away with our laundry. Every year, we expose the world’s waterways to a growing number of pollutants, including plastic debris, chemical runoff, crude oil, and others.

Fortunately, it is not too late to make amends. Help make a difference by spreading the dirty truth about water pollution.

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About Author

Kathy is the owner of Kirk Scuba Gear, a passionate Scuba Diver, Ocean Advocate and Managing Editor of The Scuba News Canada

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