Browsing: Surface Interval

Drawn to the Deep is a fascinating new book by Julie Hauserman, centered on the life of extreme diver and photographer, Wes Skiles, who passed away in 2010. Skiles was famed for bringing ‘dark alien worlds to PBX, IMAX, and the Discovery Channel, and managed to escape many dangerous scrapes he encountered while doing what he loved best: diving. The diver was once buried alive in a cave in Australia and almost eaten by a shark, who he had to fight off with his camera. As noted by Hauserman, Skiles’ prize from such a dangerous escapade was the “close-up photos…

Share.

As a writer that specializes in Scuba Diving and Scuba related travel, I spend a great deal of time looking at websites. Recently, Surface Interval (www.surfaceinterval.co) has announced they are now launching their new website. Surface Interval is looking to create a site that highlights Worldwide Scuba Diving Reviews. Scuba divers can leave reviews of the dive centers they have used. Surface Interval is quoted as saying: “Information about scuba diving is scattered across different websites. Our goal is to bring all the information divers need together on this website. We are convinced that the more people we can convince…

Share.

Steve Lewis worked as an advertising copywriter, journalist and feature writer for many years, but is best known for his work underwater. He is a cave diver/instructor, deep wreck diver/instructor, and marketing and training consultant for the dive industry. He lives in rural Ontario but admits “I get to travel to some pretty exotic places to lecture, teach, dive and explore.”

Share.

If you are a diver, much of what you learn about topics such as decompression sickness and narcosis in your scuba diving classes is over-simplified and some of it is just plain wrong, as diver training agency texts have not kept pace with the science. Despite 170 years of research, the nature of decompression sickness, decompression stress and narcosis remains unknown

Share.

A diving helmet has played a role on dry land, as well as in the water. Its inventors, brothers John and Charles Deane, patented what they called a “Smoke Helmet” in 1823. It enabled fire fighters to work in smoke-filled areas.

Share.
1 2 3 4 7