Browsing: Diver Health

The sterling work of scuba rehabilitation charity Deptherapy has been recognised once again with a prestigious military award. Dr Richard Cullen, Chairman and one of the Founders of Deptherapy & Deptherapy Education, was presented with the Veterans’ Foundation Award at the Heropreneurs Awards in association with The Telegraph, celebrated last week in London. As part of this recognition, the charity receives a much-needed donation of £10,000 from sponsor, The Veterans’ Foundation. Peter Mountford, the Chairman of Heropreneurs and Founder of the Heropreneurs Awards, said: “The Heropreneurs Awards recognise the outstanding achievements of anyone who has served in the Armed Forces,…

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Nitrogen narcosis is one of the most common dangers of deep sea diving and despite decades of study, it remains poorly understood. However, advances in science and engineering mean that researchers are on the cusp of new discoveries. In this teaser for a full-length documentary, we take a glimpse at the ongoing work of scientists in their effort to reclaim the deep.

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Nearly every diver, at some point during their diving career will experience issues with equalizing. It’s so common that nearly 89% of divers tend not to equalize properly, resulting in 29% of divers having to stay out of the water for weeks or even months due to the damage it causes. There have been many times where I have struggled with equalizing, one of which was in Thailand, where the more I pushed through, the more I suffered. Pushing through the pain is certainly not the answer. In fact, 6.3% of divers suffer with permanent damage, all because they were…

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When you feel unwell or have any symptoms after a dive it is essential to remember that the symptoms or signs are pressure-related until proven otherwise, usually, by a diagnostic or therapeutic recompression. Therefore, the doctors will ask you about pressure exposure as an aid to the diagnosis. The following specifics about the dive will be required or elicited: Where was the dive location (e.g. ocean, lake, river, quarry or cave)? some dive holidays or dive boats will provide dives continuously over seven days or more. This may be important information. When did you first have any symptoms? Did you have any symptoms after…

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A reduction in pressure while ascending at the end of a dive will release dissolved gas (principally nitrogen) from solution in the tissues and blood and consequently form bubbles in the body. DCI results from the effects of these bubbles on organ systems. The bubbles may disrupt cells and cause loss of function. They may act as emboli and block circulation especially in the capillaries. They may cause mechanical compression and stretching of the blood vessels and nerves. Additionally, the blood-bubble interface acts as a foreign surface, activating the early phases of blood coagulation and the release of substances from the cells lining the…

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The increasing popularity of SCUBA diving and growth of commercial diving has increased the incidence of decompression illness (DCI). As more people of varying ages and fitness dive more often, helped by developments in technology to go deeper and for longer, then doctors will see more cases of this condition. At our Hyperbaric Chamber in the Midlands we see many cases of DCI in divers who have observed all the rules and stayed within their tables or computer algorithms, but still develop DCI. No diver, diving school or independent instructor should think that they are immune to DCI. Here we explain how it can develop,…

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